Second Life Sims

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  1. Best Sims In Second Life
  2. Second Life Sims For Sale
  3. Second Life Sims 4 Conversion
  4. Second Life Sims For Sale

Details The Jessica Chung Estate's history dates back to Second Life's first and most successful estate Dreamland, est. Today with over 500 sims you can find many different types of residential, commercial and unzoned lands with almost all sizes fitted for individual and business needs.

I’m not sure where I was going with this post, nor do I consider it as detailed as it could otherwise be (I didn’t feel like dedicating an entire blog to it). But if you’re curious about Second Life, or want some general comparisons between it and The Sims 4, I guess you might find some of this handy… Or confusing… Or both. Don’t say you weren’t warned.

Best Sims In Second Life

  • Heterocera - Collection of sims added north of the main grid on 3/22/05. Estate Sims - Privately-owned sims; Sandboxes; Business Sims - Real Life companies are finding their way into Second Life. Other Sims - Other miscellaneous sims that don't fit in any category above.
  • Mar 18, 2021 - Explore 𝑙𝑦𝑛𝑛𝑧𝑖𝑒 🫀's board 'second life' on Pinterest. See more ideas about sims 4, sims 4 mods, sims 4 cc.
Second

Game Play.

The tagline for Second Life says it all; Your World. Your imagination. And after 6 years in that environment, I can tell you first-hand; that is its blessing and it’s curse. Second Life isn’t really a game. It’s not really a chatroom either. It’s hard to really classify what it is because it can be different things for different people. You can build, shop, explore, or just log in and hang out with friends/other avatars. You can go to concerts; either streamed music, or one that features someone performing live to a virtual audience. You can attend exhibitions featuring virtual artwork or virtual sculptures and installations created both inside and outside of Second Life. If you’re feeling particularly flirty you can “hook up” with other like-minded souls and engage in virtual sex, or if you feel like creating a story with others you can join a RPG sim (Simulation or “world”) and write as well as pose/perform actions by sitting on pose-balls. You can take part in shopping events, hunts to win prizes, and games created by other members, as well as visit gaming sims (similar to casinos where you gamble with Linden (SL’s official currency), even though gambling is supposedly illegal within the confines of SL.

You have to be connected to the internet to access Second Life as there is no offline mode. Rather than being one huge world, SL is made up of hundreds of thousands of smaller worlds, all created by other uses. The sheer size of virtual space in SL can feel overwhelming, especially if you’re familiar with The Sims games. But unlike The Sims, everyone you meet is (generally) another person behind the avatar, so generally speaking only you can control your avatar. There are means to control others, but it requires the purchase of separate HUDs and relays (RLV or Restrained Love Viewer) to use, and even then requires the other parties’ consent for most decisions. There’s a lot more to it, but putting it in a nutshell how you choose to spend your time is completely up to you.

The Sims 4 is a game. That is, there are specific goals for you to achieve, even if there is no “winning” or end-game to speak of (unless you kill your Sims or they die, but that’s another story). You start off with household funds, have to find a plot of land or house to move into, as well as furnish it how you’d like, and perform daily activities to keep your Sim happy and entertained. Along with creating your Sim, you need to select traits and aspirations (or goals that influence your Sim’s life), as well as find them a job, pay bills, make friends, have a family, marry, take vacations, host parties, and so on. The Sims is linear in terms of game play – your Sim is created, and each day takes them closer to their next life stage, either toddler, child, teen, young adult, adult, or elder, to eventually die.

You need to be connected to the internet to download and install updates as they are released, as well as download any custom content you wish to have in your game. But you don’t need to be online to play it. There is no interaction with other real life people; it’s just you playing as a benevolent of cruel god over your virtual creations. You can control others as dictated by the game, and the worlds are limited depending on how many Expansion or Stuff packs you have purchased and installed. Any adult activities you wish to undertake (beyond the game’s Teen-rating constraints) you’ll need to download and install yourself.

Appearance.

Appearance can vary greatly in Second Life, not just due to the fact there are limitless options when it comes to the use of Sliders (that manipulate your default avatar), but also custom avatars that you can purchase (more on purchases later). Originally SL avatars looked like The Sims on a bad day, but over recent years with the release of MoCap (motion Capture Animation) and Bento (Multi-point skeletal frames that allow for greater range of natural movement) SL avatars are becoming more realistic than ever. Since SL is driven by its members creation, you can pretty much find an avatar to suit your tastes, or have one made custom for you for a price. That’s another thing you really need to know about Second Life: it isn’t cheap.

While default avatars come with some Bento movement, to get more features you need to purchase them separately. And price can vary greatly in a very competitive market. Unlike The Sims, you can change your appearance as often as you like to whatever you like without the need for mods or hacks – you just buy it, unpack it (as required) and wear/attach it. Any additional body parts (genitalia, Bento hands, tongue, ears, tail, etc), walk styles, even voices, will cost you extra, including pregnancy shapes (giving your avatar a pregnant appearance), or non-human additions; Neko, Furry, animal, demon, etc.

SL avatars mimic regular speach when a user speaks using their mic; the avatar’s lips move, and they can exhibit facial and body reactions when the user activates a “gesture” (specific animation). You can even buy clothing that reacts to elements around them, for instance hair that appears stringy and wet while in Linden water, and dries when on land, or clothing that opens when touched/clicked on. When it comes to appearance (and what you can do with it) the sky (and your bank balance) is the limit.

When it comes to The Sims, let’s face it, they look like animated cartoons that are as anatomically correct as Barbie and Ken dolls. This is the style of the franchise, and while you are given Sliders to create a unique looking Sim, you are also limited by pre-set clothing, hair, skin, eye, teeth, height, age, and colour options – unless you download others. Sims all pretty much “move” the same way (walk styles notwithstanding), whereas SL avatars depend on the use of an AO or will walk “stiffly”.

A lot of clothing in The Sims is “painted on” or appear 2D/on the same layer as the Sim’s skin. Much of it isn’t. The feet aren’t defined with separate toes, nor do they have fingernails or toenails. Hair doesn’t “move”, nor do clothing or many objects react to wind or external elements (unless you have the Seasons game pack installed, and even then clothing is immune beyond “dripping”). You do get a few varying (mostly nonsensical) options for walk styles, and voice pitch/tone. Sims don’t speak English but Simlish, a language designed for the game, with thought or speach bubbles that appear over their heads showing icons of varying subjects so we have some idea what they’re talking about. Since The Sims heights are restricted the furnishings and objects they interact with match up, meaning you don’t have to edit pose-balls to fit like you do in Second Life. Downloading hair, skin, nails, clothing and so on is relatively inexpensive, and depending where you get it, free.

Price.

Second Life is free to install and run. Premium membership is billed at around $10.00 (USD) or $15.00 (AUD) a month. For that you get a stipend of 300L “free” and a small allocation of land, the second smallest available. When you wish to change your avatar from default, make purchases, rent real estate, buy clothing, hair, piercings, attachments, furnishings, have “babies” or get pregnant (or impregnate another avatar), in fact anything beyond the default avatar that you start with, then you’re going to spend money, and almost everything in Second Life is paid for in Lindens, SL’s official currency. From experience, around 5000L (Linden) equals around $20.00 AUD (Australian Dollars). You buy Linden using either Paypal, your bank account, or credit card, and bought Lindens are stored in your online account. 5000L sounds like a lot, but bear in mind the average price for a Bento mesh head is around 5000L, Bento hands 3000L, a good quality AO (animation override to dictate movement, walk, and expressions) 500-5000L, hair average 250L+ each style or colour, then you quickly realise just how expensive Second Life can be.

You might think that no one in their right mind would spend that much money for virtual items, but buying and spending in SL is insidious and lucrative. At first a dollar here or there doesn’t seem like much. But then the next must-have item is released and before you know it you’ve spent another dollar, then five, then ten. And SL is a visual medium, so looking good can be a competitive business to stand out from the crowd. If you want to have sex then you need to buy a penis or vagina, and objects/furnishings to have sex on, and huds that can impregnate or become pregnant. And if you do want to have babies then you need to buy them as well, plus furnishings for them to interract with, clothes, supplies, as well as pay for the services of a specialist to scan your HUDs and give you/your avatar a more realistic “experience” of being pregnant, as well as pay for your use of the hospital. And if you want somewhere to house your new familiy, or just a place to call your own, expect to part with even more money (See Real Estate for more info). Even creating objects comes at a cost. To upload textures, or mesh, or sound .wav files etc all costs money. Not much, around 10L a time and upwards, but do it a few dozen times and you’ve just spent $5, $10, $20, and counting.

The Sims is an upfront cost, meaning you purchase the game and that’s it as far as price goes. You purchase additional Stuff and Expansion packs as you wish, but none are needed to run the base game, they just add content and game play to what is already there. Each additional pack you buy will cost you money, Stuff packs generally $15 AUD and Expansions $50 AUD, but again once you install then that’s it. You don’t have to pay any more. It’s only when you start purchasing CC from other creators (not official game content) that you start losing money. But just like Second Life all of this is optional. I will say there’s a degree more peer pressure in SL that you don’t generally find in The Sims, primarily due to the fact that one is an online real-time environment, and the other is played alone with no one to judge or compete with.

Real Estate.

Land in Second Life falls under three categories; General (where any age can access), Mature (where adult themes are suggested and restrictions loosely enforced), and Adult (where anything goes). Adult land is popular in SL, and so is comparitively more expensive to rent than the others, as is land that is close to or on Linden Water (coastal regions, lakes, dams, rivers, etc). When you sign up as a Premium member for Second Life you are alotted a small allowance of land “free” (paid for by your monthly fee of $10.00 USD or around $15.00 AUD). Land in SL is measured in square meters, and is categorized according to size between parcel and Region or Sim (not to be confused with The Sims, but in this instance in SL Sim means world). If you want a bigger parcel of land, then you will need to “buy” it, which is a misnomer as buying land doesn’t make it “yours.” Buying merely assigns you as primary tenant. All land, even “bought/owned” land accrues monthly rent known as tier (or Land Use Fee). The bigger the land, the more tier you will pay. For instance, a 1024sqm parcel of land costs $7.00 USD ($10.00 AUD) tier a month. Whereas an entire region costs $175.00 USD (or $250.00 AUD) a month. This is AFTER the original purchase price of the land when you “bought” it.

To make things even more confusing, not every parcel of land is exactly the right size, so if for example your parcel is 1025sqm you will pay the next level of tier which is $13.00 USD ($19.00 AUD) a month. Generally speaking, to set up a full region/Sim, you are looking at around $600.00 (AUD) to buy, $100.00 (AUD) transfer fee, and additional $250.00 tier per month (and an added $100.00-$120.00 fee to rename your Sim to a name of your choosing which is optional) – all without the cost of buying houses, landscaping, or furnishings to decorate it. While you can (and many do) set up rentals for other people to “live” and rent on your Sim, again competition is fierce. It’s rare you will consistently make make enough rent from others to pay your monthly tier, so for for a good percentage of time you will be out-of-pocket.

In The Sims you are given pre-built worlds to play in, and depending on how many Stuff or Expansion packs you own, you have more options on where to go and the size land you can occupy. Each world contains vacant lots or rentals that you either move straight into pre-built and furnished, or move into and start building your home. You can download houses from the official Gallery in-game if you don’t want to build, or edit pre-existing buildings. It doesn’t matter what rental you chose your Sims will pay rent every week, with the price is determined by the size of your land and the combined cost of items you own. As with SL (and real life), homes are limited to the size of the land they occupy. You also have the freedom to decorate in whatever style you see fit. Unlike SL, there are no land maturity ratings, so you can be as obscene or reserved as you like.

Mods, downloads and CC.

Even though Second Life isn’t a game for you to cheat your way through, there are additions you can purchase/make/use to add to your virtual “experience”. You don’t really need mods per se, but you can install things such as Third Party viewers which give you more functionality than the default viewer (that you log into SL on). Third Party Viewers aren’t supported by SL, so players should download and use these at their discretion. As for other mods, the question could really be asked; how long is a piece of string? The question really depends on what it is you want to do. For instance, if you wish to drive around in a fast car, then you will need to buy it (or make it and script it), and be in a region/world that allows you to use or “rez” your vehicle. If for example you wish to be able to read all conversation within the world you are in, you can purchase a “spy” HUD for that so that others don’t know you’re listening in. I will say here, that such mods, or those that invade others’ privacy in SL are really something of a moral, ethical, and legal grey area. Remember you are playing with other people instead of a computer, so you need to be mindful of things like personal space, copyright infringement, and of course breaking the law. If reported, you can be cited with an official warning, have your account suspended, or face real life legal charges.

A major difference between The Sims and Second Life is the use of scripts and how they are installed or run. When you purchase scripts for SL, generally they will appear in your avatar’s inventory, and you can add them to objects or run as required as needed. There’s no need to download and install to separate folders before you start up/log in to SL. Another drastic difference is that users or “residents” as they are known in SL, can create objects that do specific tasks while they are in world, meaning they don’t need to leave the game and use another program to run or create it. Speaking personally, this is one of SL’s greatest assets; the ability to create objects and scripts, and get them to function in real time and see the results immediately in front of you.

If this sounds complicated, don’t worry. Unless you plan on creating your own scripted items, it isn’t something you need to worry about. Just know that a vast majority of objects, including clothing, hair, and body parts used in SL, all contain scripts, and these scripts enable these particular parts to do something; whether that is change colour, size, move, fade, or anything else. You can purchase items already scripted so all you have to do is wear them or drop them in your house, and that’s it. Or you can create them yourself. You can even learn how to script items, create mods, and so on by taking a class in world along with other people, or find a tutor to teach you one-on-one. All purchases for Second Life are made in world via a content creator’s stall/store/vendor, or via the official Marketplace, and you need to be logged in to the game/have it running in order to access them.

For The Sims games there are of course restrictions. The game was created to “run” and look a certain way, so anything that wasn’t included in the purchased game is going to need Mods, Custom Content, or other alterations to do it. A major difference between this and Second Life is cost – generally speaking almost everything costs money in SL (with the exception of “freebies” which for the most part aren’t that worthwhile), whereby you can find good quality additions for The Sims for free, with the exception of creators asking for donations or support on Patreon. You can run The Sims without any mods or CC, but it all depends on user preference. Custom content and mods can be found online either by visiting one of many specialty made sites such as The Sims Resource (which is ad-heavy), Mod the Sims, Sims 4 Updates, or various blogs like Lana CC finds, SimsVIP, or by doing a general search on any search engine like Google, or Bing, etc. Once you find content you like, then you have to ensure it is installed correctly in your Mods folder, or create the folder if you don’t already have it. Certains mods need to be installed differently than others, so ensure you take note of installation directions and recommendations.

One very important thing to note: since almost all mods or CC is NOT affiliated by the game creators, players take a risk that anything they download or install COULD BREAK THEIR GAME. In Second Life, you generally don’t have the same problem. If CC doesn’t work, you have the ability to contact the seller/creator and either get help, a replacement, or a refund. You might lag or crash, but it probably won’t “break” anything.

Final thoughts.

Visually, I love Second Life, but I hate the sheer cost of it, or rather how easy it is to spend lots and lots of money. I also hate how easy it is to get caught up in it and lose yourself too. Ask any long-term SL resident and the majority will tell you just how addictive it is. The ability to create anything in real-time and use it/see it function without having to switch programs or log in and out is incredibly fun. It’s also very time-consuming, and just like The Sims, many hours can vanish before you’re aware of it. But my greatest dislike of Second Life isn’t cost, or lag, or ugly avatars – it’s the people that populate it.

When I joined SL I was growing tired of The Sims 3 and looking for more interaction in a virtual space. SL felt like The Sims initially (and there’s even a HUD you can puchase to mimic The Sims called LIFE2), but stepping from a confined world into vast open virtually limitless space felt a little overwhelming at the start. After a short while I joined and created RPGs (role play games) and built complete regions/worlds. I wrote lots of stories, and met some amazing people (that are mentioned elsewhere on this site, and are still friends even now outside of SL). But over the years I saw a shift away from fantasy to reality. When I first joined in 2012 it was seen as odd to talk about your real life. Now there is a distinct trend towards self-validation, either by voice, photographs, or via Skype etc. If you’re old-school like me and wish to keep your real life private this can cause some problems. There are a lot of lonely people looking to make connections online in some way, and this is especially true in SL. But in the RPG community that is already small and growing smaller every year, too many people would rather focus on anything else instead of put that same effort into making good quality collaborative stories. The mood has just become for the most part toxic. And so I left.

Compared to Second Life, The Sims 4 looks cartoonish. It’s rated for teens and it shows. There’s no real challenge. No cling-to-the-edge-of-your-seat tension or excitement when I play. It’s restrictive and predictable. But just like SL it’s addictive. I lose literally hours building and decorating just how I want things to be. A huge downside is that there seems to be more bugs created with every pack that the game developers release. Scripting and content creation has to be done outside the game, and there’s always potential for breakage when I install new CC, but to some degree I get to fashion and control it to my tastes. Even with all the expansion and stuff packs, compared to what I generally used to spend in SL, The Sims costs a LOT less to play than Second Life in all areas. But The Sims is also restrictive and isolating. If I want to visit a Norse world for example, I can only download CC and build something to suit. In SL it’s a click of a mouse button away. But there’s no random requests for virtual sex, no trolls, and no sales notifications pop-ups. And I miss just spending online time with my friends.

To combat that I’ve managed to recreate them for my Sims games which in its own way is entertaining. But it’s small consolation for the real thing. Maybe one day I’ll go back to SL, but for now at least I’m content to reimerse myself in The Sims world and explore what I missed/overlooked the first time around. It is a big game really, especially without cheating my way through it and having to earn things as I progress instead of just having “everything” at my fingertips. It’s just a shame there isn’t the ability to collaborate with others (as in split-screen for example) or play online to venture into each other’s worlds – but that’s probably just inviting more toxicity down the track if Second Life, in its current state, is anything to go by.

ANSHEX > Second Life > Anshe Chung Sim

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Second Life Sims For Sale

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  • Free terrains and landscapes available
  • Full Estate Manager (EM) rights
    Region Ban
    Change terraforming and terrain
    texture
    SIM restart
  • Experienced land management team
  • Real-time sim performance monitoring
  • Access to all content of the Anshe
    Chung Library
  • 24/7 premium support online

30000 Prims Full Region for 18799 L$ per week!

  • No set up fee
  • Your sim – your rules! Full privacy
  • 30000 Prims
  • No premium account needed
  • Newest server hardware available in
    Second Life
  • Free terrains and landscapes available
  • Full Estate Manager (EM) rights
    Region Ban
    Change terraforming and terrain
    texture
    SIM restart
  • Experienced land management team
  • Real-time sim performance monitoring
  • Access to all content of the Anshe
    Chung Library
  • 24/7 premium support online

Second Life Sims 4 Conversion

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Second Life Sims For Sale

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