Intel Check Cpu Temperature

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Real temp is a standout amongst the best inclining temperature monitor software that is. The purpose of the Intel® Processor Diagnostic Tool is to verify the functionality of an Intel® microprocessor. The diagnostic tool checks for brand identification, verifies the processor operating frequency, tests specific processor features, and performs a stress test on the processor.

Real Temp is a temperature monitoring program designed for all Intel single Core, Dual Core, Quad Core and Core i7 processors.
Each core on these processors has a digital thermal sensor (DTS) that reports temperature data relative to TJMax which is the safe maximum operating core temperature for the CPU. As your CPU heats up, your Distance to TJMax will decrease. If it reaches zero, your processor will start to thermal throttle or slow down so maximizing your distance away from TJMax will help your computer run at full speed and more reliably too.

Main Features

  • Reads temperature information from all Intel Core based processors. Pentium 4 processors are not supported.
  • Ability to individually calibrate Real Temp for each core of your CPU.
  • Program is based on temperature data gathered using a Fluke 62 IR Thermometer.
  • Test Sensors feature will check your DTS sensors for any sign of problems.
  • Keeps track of Minimum and Maximum temperatures with full logging features.
  • Reporting and logging of the Intel PROCHOT# thermal throttle activity bit.
  • Quick, very accurate and repeatable benchmark.
  • Displays MHz, TJMax, CPUID, APIC ID and Calibration settings.
  • High temperature alarm and shutdown feature based on CPU or NVIDIA GPU temperature.
  • No installation or registry modifications required.
  • Support for Windows 2000 / XP / Vista / Windows 7 / Windows 8 / Windows 10 (32 & 64 bit)

Forums

Screenshots

Documentation

Temperature

See the Installation & Calibration Page.

Downloads

The latest version is available in the downloads section.

Changes in Version 3.70

  • Support for Sandy Bridge CPUs.
  • VID based power consumption estimates for the newer CPUs.
  • Improved log file formatting.
  • Added a single system tray icon that reports the maximum core temperature.
  • RealTemp GT updated for the 6 core Sandy Bridge E CPUs.
  • i7 Turbo GT 1.30 multiplier monitoring tool.

Changes in Version 3.60

  • Added Core i Turbo multiplier and Turbo TDP/TDC overclocking for Extreme / K series CPUs.
  • Added ATI GPU and improved NVIDIA GPU monitoring with CrossFire and SLI support.
  • Added a system tray / notification area font selector.
  • New Fahrenheit and 3 digit system tray option.
  • Fixed Core 2 Extreme multiplier reporting.
  • Fixed Core 2 mobile CPU C0% based load reporting.
  • Changed how Core 2 Super Low Frequency Mode (SLFM) is reported.
  • Improved sensor test consistency.
  • Bug with Reset button on ATI systems fixed.
  • RealTemp GT for the 6 core Gulftown CPUs was also updated.
  • Separate i7 Turbo GT multiplier monitoring tool for 6 core Gulftown CPUs added.

Changes in Version 3.40

  • Core i7/i5/Xeon socket 1156 support including accurate turbo mode reporting.
  • new information window for Nvidia GPUs with improved SLI support.
  • correct reporting of Super Low Frequency Mode (SLFM) for Core 2 mobile CPUs.
  • correct reporting of Intel Dynamic Acceleration (IDA) for Core 2 mobile CPUs.
  • added VID reporting to the main GUI for Core 2 based CPUs.
  • added a Fahrenheit=1 INI file option.
  • added the option to view a Task Manager based or a C0% based load meter.
  • added the ability to toggle C1E state and view the SpeedStep (EIST) state.
  • improved dual and multi-monitor support including Anchor mode.
  • includes RealTemp GT, a 6 core version of RealTemp for Gulftown CPUs.
  • includes i7 Turbo, a high precision multiplier monitoring tool for all Core CPUs.
  • and includes LoadTester, a variable load, single core testing program.
  • Skull=1 or Skull=2 INI option for reading each CPU on a Dual Quad system.
  • thanks rge, burebista and somebody on TPU for all of your ideas and help.

Changes in Version 3.00

  • Core i7 temperature and frequency support including Turbo mode.
  • NVIDIA temperature reporting with highest GPU temperature displayed in SLI mode.
  • Ability to run a file or shutdown based on user defined alarm temperature.
  • Updated interface with modern XP / Vista style and border in Mini Mode.
  • Start Minimized Vista issues finally fixed.
  • New RivaTuner plug-in support.
  • Extra information on the main screen and the retirement of the toggle button.
  • Switch to UNICODE for better international support.
  • Adjustable GUI colors and bold System Tray font option.
  • TJMax updated based on new Intel documentation and further testing.
  • Calibration formula simplified.
  • All new CPU Cool Down Test for a more thorough look at your sensors.
  • Clock Modulation & Minimize on Close options.
  • New CPU Load meter, log file headings and Distance to TJMax in the System Tray.
  • 101 other improvements including initial Windows 7 Beta support.

Changes in Version 2.70

  • Redesigned user interface (GUI) with larger temperature fonts.
  • Added a movable Mini-Mode that is turned on and off with a double left mouse click on the GUI.
  • Added an Anchor position so the GUI will move to a fixed screen position after a double right mouse click.
  • Anchor position can be customized by holding down the Shift key while double right clicking.
  • The correct physical core order of Quad core processors is now reported based on APIC ID.
  • Added reporting of Minimum and Maximum VID as well as current VID.
  • A new user selectable high temperature alarm with two alarms for Quad core processors.
  • More accurate MHz calculation as well as FSB and CPU multiplier reporting.
  • New program Up Time feature.
  • Bug fix for log file output when using a Single or Dual core processor.
  • Fixed and improved the Default button in the Settings window.
  • Button labels and functionality changed in Settings window to follow the Windows style guide.
  • Improved multi-threading and memory usage for better long term stability.
  • Start Minimized option improved for better Vista support. See the documentation for more info.
  • Option to save the Log file in .CSV format for easy Excel support.
  • Gamer Mode temporarily retired.
Intel Check Cpu Temperature

Changes in Version 2.60

  • Added a new Settings screen where all adjustments can be made in real time including TjMax.
  • Temperatures of any core are now displayed in the System Tray area. Thanks W1zzard!
  • 4 font options for the System Tray.
  • Choice of Current, Minimum, Maximum or Average termperature displayed in the System Tray.
  • Test Sensors feature improved to increase repeatability.
  • CPU real time MHz calculation was re-worked for better SetFSB / ClockGen support.
  • Calibration options now include one digit after the decimal point for finer adjustments.
  • Experimental Gamer Mode introduced which allows core temperatures to be seen in some games.

Changes in Version 2.5

  • Added minimize to System Tray support.
  • Correctly reports CPU MHz for the new 45nm processors.
  • Displays CPU voltage identification (VID).
  • Start minimized option and now opens and closes in the same location.

Changes in Version 2.41

  • adjustable Idle calibration for each core and expanded range from -3 to 3.
  • adjustable TjMax for each core.
  • log interval options expanded from 1 to 60 seconds.
  • a change of timers used for the benchmark feature to better support overclocking from within Windows.
  • Reset button added to the gui to reset minimum and maximum temperatures.
  • better support of the Enter and Tab keys.

Is your computer’s CPU too hot? If your PC starts spontaneously shutting down, locking up, or acting sluggish during intense tasks, overheating could be the issue. Keeping tabs on your CPU temperatures is crucial when you’re overclocking your PC’s processor, too—you don’t want to accidentally push the performance pedal too far to the metal.

Bizarrely, Windows doesn’t offer any way to check your computer’s CPU temperature. You could dive into your system’s BIOS to find the information, but that’s a lot of hassle to find a simple sensor reading. Fortunately, several free programs exist that make it easy to see your processor’s temperature.

How to check your CPU temperature

The fastest, easiest way to check your CPU temperature is the aptly named Core Temp. Be mindful during installation though! Like many free programs, it tries to install bloatware unless you uncheck some boxes during setup.

Once you’ve installed Core Temp, opening it shows a no-frills look at the current state of your processor, including an average temperature reading at the bottom of the window. If you want even more detail, click the Show hidden icons button in the system tray located at the right edge of your Windows taskbar. You’ll see a temperature listing for every individual CPU core in your computer.

Intel

Core Temp’s Settings menu allows you to tweak exactly what you’ll see in the system tray, and how you’ll see it, but the default configuration makes it dead-simple to see if your CPU is overheating or performing as expected.

How can i check cpu temperature

How Do I Check Cpu Temperature

Core Temp isn’t the only option though. HWInfo is an in-depth system monitoring tool that provides deep details about every piece of your PC’s hardware. If you choose to run it in sensors-only mode, scrolling down to the CPU section—the dedicated section, not the CPU temperature portion of the motherboard listing—reveals current temps and other nitty-gritty details.

NZXT’s Cam software is another popular option with a diverse skillset. Its slick interface is easier to read at a glance than those on most other monitoring tools, and the program shows all sorts of useful info about your CPU, graphics card, memory, and storage. Cam also includes an in-game FPS overlay and overclocking tools, among other features. You can use NZXT’s Cam mobile apps to keep tabs on your software when you’re away from your PC, too.

Open Hardware Monitor and SpeedFan are other well-regarded monitoring tools that can track system information. You’ve got options! But for simply checking your computer’s CPU temperatures, Core Temp’s straightforward focus can’t be beat.

Finally, note that if you’re running an AMD Ryzen system, you may see two different CPU temperature readings. You want the “Tdie” reading, depending on how the program you’re using displays the info. It’s a measurement of the actual heat on the die. The alternative “Tctl” reading is the control temperature reported to your cooling system and sometimes includes a temperature offset to ensure universal fan speed behavior between the various Ryzen chips. Any of the programs above that list a single temperature account for the offset already.

Is my CPU too hot?

The maximum supported temperature varies from processor to processor. Most of the free monitoring software mentioned above lists the information as “Tj. Max.” That stands for the temperature junction, or the highest operating temperature of the hardware. If you don’t see the information for some reason, search the CPU World website for your CPU’s model number to find the information. Every program listed above displays your processor’s model number, so it’s easy to find.

But that’s the maximum temperature—the point at which your processor freaks out and shuts down to avoid damage. Running anywhere near that hot regularly is bad for the long-term life of your hardware. Instead, follow this general rule of thumb regarding CPU temperatures under load.

  • Under 60° C: You’re running great!
  • 60° C to 70° C: Still running fine, but getting a bit warmer. Consider cleaning the dust out of your PC if CPU temperatures continue to creep up over time.
  • 70° C to 80° C: This is hotter than you want to run unless you’re pushing an overclock. If you’re not, definitely check to make sure your fans are working and there aren’t dust bunnies clogging up your system’s airflow.
  • 80° C to 90° C: Now we’re getting too hot for long-term comfort. Check your hardware for broken fans or dust build-up, and if you’re overclocking, dial back your settings—especially the voltage if you’ve tweaked it. One notable exception: We sometimes see more powerful laptop processors hit the low 80s during gaming sessions when plugged in, at which point they start throttling back performance. This is expected, but if temperatures cross 85° C, be concerned.
  • Over 90° C: Danger, Will Robinson!

How Check Cpu Temperature

How to lower your CPU temperatures

If you’re regularly encountering high CPU temperatures, there are some steps you can take to try and fix the issue.

First, clean out your PC. High CPU temperatures are often caused by years of dust and grime built up inside a PC, clogging fans and crucial air pathways. Local hardware stores usually charge outrageous prices for canned air, but you can pick up a bottle for about $7 on Amazon, or four for $18. PCWorld’s guide on how to clean your PC can walk you through the process. While you’re at it, check to make sure that all your fans are working correctly, and that none of the vents in your PC are blocked.

Hopefully that fixes the issue. If not, more intensive steps are in order. The thermal paste that transfers heat from your CPU to its cooler might have dried out if you’ve had your PC for a few years. That can cause temperature spikes.

Removing the old thermal paste with rubbing alcohol and a applying fresh layer can potentially help lower temperatures by a large amount. TechAdvisor has a helpful, illustrated article on how to remove and apply thermal paste, and you can find small syringes of thermal paste by respected brands like Arctic and Noctua for under $7 on Amazon. (I’ve been a happy Arctic Silver 5 user for years now.)

If all that doesn’t help, your cooling solution simply might not be capable of keeping up with your CPU’s heat output, especially if you’re pairing a stock cooler or a modest third-party cooler with higher-end chips—and doubly so if you’re overclocking. Buying a new CPU cooler may be in order.

The Cooler Master Hyper 212 ($30 on Amazon) is a solid, affordable air cooler. With its larger heatsink and fan, it’s a solid step up over stock AMD and Intel CPU coolers. Moving up in size and price, the Noctua NH-D14 ($75 on Amazon) is one of the most effective air coolers ever to hit the streets, but its large size might block memory access or not even fit in smaller cases.

Whats My Cpu Temp

Closed-loop liquid cooling solutions (CLCs) provide far cooler temperatures than air coolers with minimal hassle. The 120mm Corsair H80i v2 ($95 on Amazon) is a great entry-level CLC, but if you plan on overclocking, consider moving up to the Corsair H100i v2 ($109 on Amazon) and its larger 240mm radiator, which can accommodate even fierce overclocks. We’ve been using one inside PCWorld’s dedicated graphics card benchmarking system for years now.