Cpu Temp Screen

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To get the best of both worlds, you can pin CPU temperature and GPU temperature to the taskbar. Once pinned, those temperatures will be updated constantly to give you the live reading. So, without further ado, let me show you the way to display or show CPU and GPU temperature on.

  • Feb 19, 2020 When the CPU is idle, or not being used by any program, a healthy temperature is anything under or around 50 degrees Celsius (122 degrees Fahrenheit). Under higher load, such as when playing a.
  • SolarWinds CPU Load Monitor EDITOR’S CHOICE. The SolarWinds CPU Load Monitor is part of the.

We’ve all been there: hours into an intense gaming session when all of a sudden, the PC overheats and shuts off. Overheating chips are annoying at best and potentially damaging to your PC at worst. Get ahead of the problem by keeping an eye on your CPU and GPU temps.

You can monitor CPU and GPU temperatures while gaming by downloading a system monitoring utility—such as Smart Game Booster, MSI Afterburner, and HWiNFO—or gaming on sites that include built-in FPS counters—such as Steam, Origin, and Valve.

With the average gaming time increasing by 60%, it’s more important than ever to monitor our chip temps to ensure everything is within a safe range. But no one wants to keep pausing or shutting down their game to do that; so, it’s helpful to know how to do it in-game.

What Is the Ideal CPU and GPU Temp?

Before we get into how to monitor your CPU and GPU temp, it makes sense that you first learn what the ideal temp is, or the numbers you watch won’t mean anything to you.

Remember that the two chips are separate from one another, even though they work together. That means you’ll need to monitor both separately. The optimal running temps are:

  • CPU: 167°-176°F (75°-80°C)
  • GPU: 149 to 185°F (65 to 85°C)

Temperatures higher than those listed above are dangerous and can cause overheating and potential damage and information loss.

CPU Temp ranges for different CPU loads

Below is a really useful comparison table from a Reddit thread showing the different cpu temperature ranges for different cpu loads.

Source: https://www.reddit.com/r/buildapc/comments/9lljy9/what_are_ideal_dangerous_temps_for_you_cpu_and_gpu/

Monitoring CPU and GPU Temp When Gaming

The most practical way to monitor CPU and GPU usage is to do so while gaming, without having to stop what you’re doing to check them. The following two solutions will allow you to do just that.

Download an In-Game System Monitoring Utility

If you don’t want to be limited to gaming sites with in-game FPS counters, you can download a game optimizing or system monitoring utility that displays CPU and GPU temps on a corner of your screen while gaming.

A few examples of these are:

Many of these tools are free, and most will also display other helpful system info, such as motherboard temperature and fan speed.

Some even signal you with alerts if your system is in danger of overheating. All of these features, plus the convenience of monitoring your temps in-game, make these tools worth looking into.

Play on Sites that Include In-Game FPS Counters

A less flexible but more straightforward solution than downloading game-enhancing utilities is just to play online games using sites with their own FPS counters.

You might already be playing on one of these sites without realizing it:

Although you’ll be limited to games that are on the sites, you won’t have to worry about researching, downloading, and figuring out new software. If you just want to get to your game without having to download anything, this might be the way to go for you.

Cpu Temp Screen

Monitoring CPU and GPU Temp In-Between Gaming

If neither solution above appeals to you, you can always check your CPU and GPU temp outside of gaming time using one of the following methods.

Install a Temperature Sensor

Installing a temperature sensor on your PC case is a bit of a hands-on process, but once it’s installed, it’s a no-brainer. Also sometimes called a temp probe, this device will monitor your temperature and fan speed and display information on an LED screen.

Access the BIOS

It’s incredibly easy to check your CPU’s temp on the motherboard’s BIOS (Basic Input Output System), although it will require restarting your PC.

To do so:

  1. Turn on or reboot your PC
  2. As soon as you hear the boot-up sequence’s signal beep, press the BIOS key.
    1. The BIOS key will vary from PC to PC, but it’s usually Delete, Escape, F1 or F2. The BIOS key will sometimes be displayed during the boot-up process as “Press [key] to access BIOS.” If not, check your PC’s or motherboard’s manual to determine the right key.
  3. Different BIOS sections will be laid out differently, but the CPU settings should be easy to find. The settings will include your CPU’s temp.

This is a pretty straightforward way of getting the information, although it can be a slow process, depending on how quickly your computer reboots.

Run nvidia-sml.exe

Nvidia GPU users will find running the “nvidia-smi.exe” command is an easy way to view CPU and GPU temps in just a few steps.

All you have to do is:

  1. Press WIN + R. This will prompt the Run command
  2. Type “cmd” then hit the Enter key
  3. Go to “C:Program FilesNVIDIA CorporationNVSMI” and find “nvidia-smi.exe.”
  4. Drag the file to the black window. Press the Enter key.
  5. The CPU and GPU temperatures, along with other information, should now be displayed in the window.

This method is even quicker than checking the temps in the BIOS, so it’s worth trying if you have a Nvidia GPU.

Preventing CPU and GPU from Overheating

Below are a handful of the easiest things you can do to keep your GPU and CPU from overheating and improve your PC’s performance while gaming.

Clean Your Computer

One of the number one causes of overheating is a computer covered in dust, trapping heat inside the unit. It’s essential to clean your PC regularly—if you’ve been slacking and haven’t gotten around to it in a while, it’s time to get to work:

  1. Purchase a can of compressed air and a microfiber cloth.
  2. Take the case off and remove all dust from it using the cloth and/or air.
  3. Using the air, remove any dust from the circuit board.
  4. Pay extra attention to your graphics card since it’s so susceptible to overheating.
  5. Replace the cover.

Nobody likes doing it, but cleaning your PC is an easy way to keep it running efficiently without overheating. Make sure to clean it every few months at least.

Ensure There is Good Ventilation

Another reason that your CPU or GPU might overheat is a lack of airflow, which causes the heat they generate to stay trapped inside the PC with no way of dissipating. The heat continues to build until the unit shuts off.

Ensure your PC’s vents are open and unblocked, with plenty of room around the unit for air to circulate freely; this might include elevating it or putting it on a hard surface rather than carpet.

Replace the Internal Fan

How To Display Cpu Temperature

If your PC is overheating regularly, even though it’s clean and well-ventilated, it might be time to replace the interior cooling fan with a newer or more powerful one.

The CPU, GPU, and other components in the circuit board generate a lot of heat when used, so they need assistance in keeping cool. If your PC has a subpar fan, it might not be cooling them down as effectively as it could be.

Add an External Fan

Another option for keeping your PC's elements at a safe temperature is by adding an external fan, which assists the internal fan in keeping everything cooled down. It’s a good idea to try it if you’ve been experiencing overheating or noticeable slowdowns over a long period.

How to monitor cpu temps windows 10

You can use a small desk fan or buy one specifically designed to clip onto your PC’s case.

Final Thoughts

Now that you know how to check your CPU and GPU temperature during and in-between gaming sessions, you won’t have to deal with the stress of an overheated PC shutting down unexpectedly. Prevention is the best medicine, though, so make sure to do what you can to keep your unit cool to prevent high temperatures in the first place.

Real Temp is a temperature monitoring program designed for all Intel single Core, Dual Core, Quad Core and Core i7 processors.
Each core on these processors has a digital thermal sensor (DTS) that reports temperature data relative to TJMax which is the safe maximum operating core temperature for the CPU. As your CPU heats up, your Distance to TJMax will decrease. If it reaches zero, your processor will start to thermal throttle or slow down so maximizing your distance away from TJMax will help your computer run at full speed and more reliably too.

Main Features

  • Reads temperature information from all Intel Core based processors. Pentium 4 processors are not supported.
  • Ability to individually calibrate Real Temp for each core of your CPU.
  • Program is based on temperature data gathered using a Fluke 62 IR Thermometer.
  • Test Sensors feature will check your DTS sensors for any sign of problems.
  • Keeps track of Minimum and Maximum temperatures with full logging features.
  • Reporting and logging of the Intel PROCHOT# thermal throttle activity bit.
  • Quick, very accurate and repeatable benchmark.
  • Displays MHz, TJMax, CPUID, APIC ID and Calibration settings.
  • High temperature alarm and shutdown feature based on CPU or NVIDIA GPU temperature.
  • No installation or registry modifications required.
  • Support for Windows 2000 / XP / Vista / Windows 7 / Windows 8 / Windows 10 (32 & 64 bit)

Forums

Screenshots

Documentation

See the Installation & Calibration Page.

Downloads

The latest version is available in the downloads section.

Changes in Version 3.70

  • Support for Sandy Bridge CPUs.
  • VID based power consumption estimates for the newer CPUs.
  • Improved log file formatting.
  • Added a single system tray icon that reports the maximum core temperature.
  • RealTemp GT updated for the 6 core Sandy Bridge E CPUs.
  • i7 Turbo GT 1.30 multiplier monitoring tool.

Changes in Version 3.60

  • Added Core i Turbo multiplier and Turbo TDP/TDC overclocking for Extreme / K series CPUs.
  • Added ATI GPU and improved NVIDIA GPU monitoring with CrossFire and SLI support.
  • Added a system tray / notification area font selector.
  • New Fahrenheit and 3 digit system tray option.
  • Fixed Core 2 Extreme multiplier reporting.
  • Fixed Core 2 mobile CPU C0% based load reporting.
  • Changed how Core 2 Super Low Frequency Mode (SLFM) is reported.
  • Improved sensor test consistency.
  • Bug with Reset button on ATI systems fixed.
  • RealTemp GT for the 6 core Gulftown CPUs was also updated.
  • Separate i7 Turbo GT multiplier monitoring tool for 6 core Gulftown CPUs added.

Changes in Version 3.40

  • Core i7/i5/Xeon socket 1156 support including accurate turbo mode reporting.
  • new information window for Nvidia GPUs with improved SLI support.
  • correct reporting of Super Low Frequency Mode (SLFM) for Core 2 mobile CPUs.
  • correct reporting of Intel Dynamic Acceleration (IDA) for Core 2 mobile CPUs.
  • added VID reporting to the main GUI for Core 2 based CPUs.
  • added a Fahrenheit=1 INI file option.
  • added the option to view a Task Manager based or a C0% based load meter.
  • added the ability to toggle C1E state and view the SpeedStep (EIST) state.
  • improved dual and multi-monitor support including Anchor mode.
  • includes RealTemp GT, a 6 core version of RealTemp for Gulftown CPUs.
  • includes i7 Turbo, a high precision multiplier monitoring tool for all Core CPUs.
  • and includes LoadTester, a variable load, single core testing program.
  • Skull=1 or Skull=2 INI option for reading each CPU on a Dual Quad system.
  • thanks rge, burebista and somebody on TPU for all of your ideas and help.

Changes in Version 3.00

  • Core i7 temperature and frequency support including Turbo mode.
  • NVIDIA temperature reporting with highest GPU temperature displayed in SLI mode.
  • Ability to run a file or shutdown based on user defined alarm temperature.
  • Updated interface with modern XP / Vista style and border in Mini Mode.
  • Start Minimized Vista issues finally fixed.
  • New RivaTuner plug-in support.
  • Extra information on the main screen and the retirement of the toggle button.
  • Switch to UNICODE for better international support.
  • Adjustable GUI colors and bold System Tray font option.
  • TJMax updated based on new Intel documentation and further testing.
  • Calibration formula simplified.
  • All new CPU Cool Down Test for a more thorough look at your sensors.
  • Clock Modulation & Minimize on Close options.
  • New CPU Load meter, log file headings and Distance to TJMax in the System Tray.
  • 101 other improvements including initial Windows 7 Beta support.

Changes in Version 2.70

  • Redesigned user interface (GUI) with larger temperature fonts.
  • Added a movable Mini-Mode that is turned on and off with a double left mouse click on the GUI.
  • Added an Anchor position so the GUI will move to a fixed screen position after a double right mouse click.
  • Anchor position can be customized by holding down the Shift key while double right clicking.
  • The correct physical core order of Quad core processors is now reported based on APIC ID.
  • Added reporting of Minimum and Maximum VID as well as current VID.
  • A new user selectable high temperature alarm with two alarms for Quad core processors.
  • More accurate MHz calculation as well as FSB and CPU multiplier reporting.
  • New program Up Time feature.
  • Bug fix for log file output when using a Single or Dual core processor.
  • Fixed and improved the Default button in the Settings window.
  • Button labels and functionality changed in Settings window to follow the Windows style guide.
  • Improved multi-threading and memory usage for better long term stability.
  • Start Minimized option improved for better Vista support. See the documentation for more info.
  • Option to save the Log file in .CSV format for easy Excel support.
  • Gamer Mode temporarily retired.

Changes in Version 2.60

  • Added a new Settings screen where all adjustments can be made in real time including TjMax.
  • Temperatures of any core are now displayed in the System Tray area. Thanks W1zzard!
  • 4 font options for the System Tray.
  • Choice of Current, Minimum, Maximum or Average termperature displayed in the System Tray.
  • Test Sensors feature improved to increase repeatability.
  • CPU real time MHz calculation was re-worked for better SetFSB / ClockGen support.
  • Calibration options now include one digit after the decimal point for finer adjustments.
  • Experimental Gamer Mode introduced which allows core temperatures to be seen in some games.

Changes in Version 2.5

  • Added minimize to System Tray support.
  • Correctly reports CPU MHz for the new 45nm processors.
  • Displays CPU voltage identification (VID).
  • Start minimized option and now opens and closes in the same location.

Changes in Version 2.41

Cpu Temp Screen Recorder

  • adjustable Idle calibration for each core and expanded range from -3 to 3.
  • adjustable TjMax for each core.
  • log interval options expanded from 1 to 60 seconds.
  • a change of timers used for the benchmark feature to better support overclocking from within Windows.
  • Reset button added to the gui to reset minimum and maximum temperatures.
  • better support of the Enter and Tab keys.